Safari live cam

Have you ever wondered how the Safari Rally TV signal is transmitted live? Here is your answer

For starters, all rally cars are equipped with multiple on-board cameras (driver, front, side, rear, pedals and interior) which are linked to powerful wireless transmitters installed in the car.

File photo / Courtesy

Have you ever wondered how World Rally Championship speed cars are streamed live to your screen in real time and without breaking a single frame? Well, here is your answer.


Rally cars are known to run at maximum speeds at certain points reaching 180 km/h, but despite advanced modern technology, it would not be guaranteed to get 100% signal transmission from all stages, especially in the vast Kenyan Rift Valley with difficult network coverage.


For the World Rally Championships, the organizers have invested heavily in live signal transmissions and nothing is left to chance to broadcast one of the most watched competitions in the world.


For starters, all rally cars are equipped with multiple on-board cameras (driver, front, side, rear, pedals and interior) which are linked to powerful wireless transmitters installed in the car.


Point-to-point transmitters will then transmit the signal directly to a receiver mounted on a special jet aircraft that circles above the clouds at approximately 15,000ft – 30,000ft within the radius of the competition stages.


Our www.michezoafrika.com spot check of the flight radar during the Kasarani special revealed the availability of a Beech B200c aircraft circling the Kasarani area at 28,000 feet. It is the aircraft that receives signals from the ground and sends them directly to the Naivasha ground station.


In addition to the cameras on the rally cars, there are special ground cameras and a special helicopter that also has powerful cameras that provide aerial shots. Power from the helicopter is also transmitted directly to the special Rally aircraft which then sends the video signals to the ground station located at the Naivasha service center.


The studio then broadcasts the mixed master signal via satellite transmission and is then redistributed to television stations and online platforms around the world.


The aircraft flew about five hours, then landed to refuel during the lunch break, ready for the afternoon rounds.


In an exclusive interview, michezoafrika.com found that one of these planes was destroyed when it nose-landed in Miami on a test flight shortly before flying to Nairobi for the Safari Rally.


The aircraft is leased by the World Rally Championship (WRC) and is also used in other international competitions, including the Tour de France, European Rally Championships and other top global competitions.


Watching all the action live requires a subscription to the World Rally Championship website where you can watch all the action live including all the interviews.


You can watch the video below for a live behind-the-scenes broadcast.